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From Léonie Geisendorf's office on Engelbrektsgatan in Stockholm. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

From Léonie Geisendorf's office on Engelbrektsgatan in Stockholm. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Upwind
Léonie Geisendorf architecture

12 April - 31 August 2014

One of the most uncompromising and innovative architects of our age. Welcome to the architect Léonie Geisendorf’s living room.

As Le Corbusier’s heir apparent in Sweden, she has played a prominent role as an architect, teacher and influential voice in the urban planning debate. Few architects have been as uncompromising with form and functionality as Polish-born Léonie Geisendorf.

Her buildings – regardless of whether they are ten-storey blocks or detached houses – are characterised by special care for detail, atmosphere and an understanding of life in the rooms she designs. Always with a focus on people, or as she says herself: “A building with people in it, that’s beautiful!” Taken as a whole, her output represents some of the finest examples of Swedish post-war architecture.

The exhibition has been created as an interpretation of Léonie Geisendorf’s own living room, and shows a selection of her projects and buildings, with a focus on the Stockholm area. It features, among other things, the internationally recognised “Vocational school for home education and sewing”, i.e. S:t Görans Gymnasium on Kungsholmen from 1961. Perhaps the most obvious heir to Le Corbusier’s utopian modernism. Also on display is the popular area of terraced houses along Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen from 1956 and two detached houses in Djursholm. All three are examples of architecture that reflect their time, but that are very much alive and being populated, developed and used by new generations of people.

The exhibition encourages a conversation about architecture by highlighting a selection of built and non-built projects. In connection with this there will be a number of study visits to buildings created by Léonie Geisendorf and seminars about current issues relating to her projects. A reprint of articles and supplementary material about Léonie Geisendorf’s architecture published in partnership with the magazine Arkitektur serves as a catalogue.

Curator/project management: Tove Dumon-Wallsten/Testbedstudio arkitekter. Expert advisor: Charlie Gullström.
Exhibition architecture: Testbedstudio arkitekter. In partnership with: Svenska Bostäder, KTH and the magazine Arkitektur.
Photos: Åke Eson Lindman, Mikael Olson, Sune Sundahl, Matti Östling.
Exhibition coordinator: Karin Åberg Waern

Images from the exhibition


Léonie Geisendorf in Le Corbusier's studio on Rue de Sèvres in Paris.

Léonie Geisendorf in Le Corbusier's studio on Rue de Sèvres in Paris.

S:t Görans Gymnasium, ritat av Leonie Geisendorf.

S:t Görans Gymnasium, ritat av Leonie Geisendorf.

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen. Louise Geisendorf och Charles-Edouard Geisendorf. Photo: Matti Östling / ArkDes

More images

Read more about the exhibition

As Le Corbusier’s heir apparent in Sweden, she has played a prominent role as an architect, teacher and influential voice in the urban planning debate. Few architects have been as uncompromising with form and functionality as Polish-born Léonie Geisendorf.

Her buildings – regardless of whether they are ten-storey blocks or detached houses – are characterised by special care for detail, atmosphere and an understanding of life in the rooms she designs. Always with a focus on people, or as she says herself: “A building with people in it, that’s beautiful!” Taken as a whole, her output represents some of the finest examples of Swedish post-war architecture.

The exhibition has been created as an interpretation of Léonie Geisendorf’s own living room, and shows a selection of her projects and buildings, with a focus on the Stockholm area. It features, among other things, the internationally recognised “Vocational school for home education and sewing”, i.e. S:t Görans Gymnasium on Kungsholmen from 1961. Perhaps the most obvious heir to Le Corbusier’s utopian modernism. Also on display is the popular area of terraced houses along Riksrådsvägen in Bagarmossen from 1956 and two detached houses in Djursholm. All three are examples of architecture that reflect their time, but that are very much alive and being populated, developed and used by new generations of people.

The exhibition encourages a conversation about architecture by highlighting a selection of built and non-built projects. In connection with this there will be a number of study visits to buildings created by Léonie Geisendorf and seminars about current issues relating to her projects. A reprint of articles and supplementary material about Léonie Geisendorf’s architecture published in partnership with the magazine Arkitektur serves as a catalogue.

Curator/project management: Tove Dumon-Wallsten/Testbedstudio arkitekter. Expert advisor: Charlie Gullström.
Exhibition architecture: Testbedstudio arkitekter. In partnership with: Svenska Bostäder, KTH and the magazine Arkitektur.
Photos: Åke Eson Lindman, Mikael Olson, Sune Sundahl, Matti Östling.
Exhibition coordinator: Karin Åberg Waern